The Best Touch-Screen Conference Room Display Solutions for Today’s Offices

Meetings

The Top Five Touch Screen Devices for Digital Signage Around the Office

The world of large-format, interactive displays can be overwhelming. Here’s a quick run-through.

Searching for the best and brightest touch screens for your office? Sounds like someone got an increase in their A/V budget. We’re not surprised, seeing as employee experience and self-service tech is a hot topic these days, with a 2017 Deloitte study stating that almost 80 percent of executives believe it’s important to very important. One way to improve employee experience is with transparency and visibility. Large-format touch screen displays showing interactive office maps in your lobby, kitchen, and elevator bay, for example, accomplish just that.

There are obvious benefits that come from investing in office digital signage: improved wayfinding, increased visibility, simple conference room check-in, etc. But companies who take initiative to invest aren’t just spending to spend. They’re making a statement to the entire organization that they’re investing in improving the quality of employees day-to-day. They’re investing in workplace.

Interested in conference room reservation software to pair with your display devices? Start a 14-day free trial to see if Robin is right for your office.

Touch screen display features to look for:

For the best-case scenario when employees interact with a conference room touch screen display in your office, we recommend looking for these qualities to make for a quick, easy and accurate experience. 

Multi-touch vs single-touch: if you’re looking to use software that has zoom capabilities (like Robin interactive Maps), you want to look for multi-touch displays. These could also be good for large-format displays where multiple people may be trying to click around, or if the software has any added multi-touch functionality (similar to Apple’s trackpad two-finger scroll or page flip motions). 

5-wire resistive or infrared touch screens: Between the two, they cover the best circumstances for touch screen technology from transmissivity, type of object able to be used (stylus vs. finger), and more.There are technically five different types of touch screen technology, which you can read more about here.

What are the best conference room display devices?

We made a quick list of five the best touch screen options for your office. At Robin, we’ve tried out both Chromebase and Elo touch screen displays, both being solid options as they’re relatively easy to mount and setup. We also pulled some favorites from across the web. 

1. Chromebase

Chromebase conference room display solution
Pros: Familiar operating system for many folks (Google Chrome), easy to set up, cost-effective
Cons:
Size options are limited (22”, 24”), some have single-touch only so be sure to read the fine print

More info here

2. Elo

Elo touchscreen conference room display solution
Pros: Many size options, infrared display, multitouch
Cons:
Display only. Need to purchase an Elo computer module separately, or plug it into a PC or content management system.

More info here

3. Leyard & Planar

Leyard & Planar conference room display solution
Pros: Many format and size options, from seamless to matrixed video walls to simple large format touch screen displays. Includes infrared and multi-touch options.
Cons:
They seem to be expensive (but, you get what you pay for, if you’re looking for a 70” display or an entire wall)

More info here

4. LG

LG conference room display solution with infrared and embedded whiteboard app
Pros: LG’s brand reputation, infrared, embedded whiteboard app
Cons:
Display only, have to connect content management via separate module or laptop, 10 point touch (others have more)

More info here

5. ViewSonic

ViewSonic cost-effective, multi-touch conference room display solution
Pros: Infrared, 20 point multi-touch, cost-effective
Cons:
We haven’t found examples of cons yet, but we’ll keep you posted

More info here

What if I already have a ton of traditional displays devices and TVs for our office?

You’re in luck. A fair amount of the larger format touch screen technology we’ve seen works with a standard TV. Seems like the industry recognizes it’s worth reusing a standard TV and simply making it touch-enabled with an overlay “frame” of sorts. Here are a ton of size options for infrared, multi-touch overlays from OPTIR via Tyco Touch

Where should these touch screens live?

Conference room display devices should live outside of every conference room in the office, showing whether or not a room is free to book, a meeting is scheduled for minutes from now, or a meeting is taking place, all with color visuals making it clear even from across the office (green = available, yellow = meeting scheduled, red = unavailable). 

Employees checking into a scheduled meeting can simply tap the conference room display before entering. If a meeting ends early, they can free it back up to the rest of the office via the room display which immediately syncs back to the company calendar. For on-demand meetings, the room display makes it easy to book a conference room on the fly.

An ideal office scenario would be to have a large-format touch screen monitor in your lobby and on each floor in the elevator bay or kitchen areas. These are often the highest-trafficked collision points in an office and therefore the places where employees would greatly benefit from seeing an interactive map and schedule of the workplace. 

As your company grows, you’ll want to keep up the pace of strong internal communications and visibility. Large-format displays, especially touch screen ones, help you accomplish this objective really easily.

From wayfinding and conference room booking to internal communications of all types, having touch screens in high-traffic locations will make you look like the office admin superstar you really are. You could welcome new hires, tell everyone about a new product, or roll out a brand new software tool (like Robin) via these screens.

Make sure you have the right stakeholders and resources to keep the screens up-to-date, and then watch as the employee experience surveys improve.